Dealing with Rural Crime

Suffolk is one of the safest places to live and work and the chances that you, your family or your neighbours will become a victim of crime are low. Suffolk is also a very rural county and incidents of ‘rural’ or ‘agricultural’ crime do occur and these incidents are taken extremely seriously by Suffolk Police.  Officers work with partners and landowners to provide advice and assistance to ensure that all is done to prevent rural crimes from occurring.

NFU Logo
Rural Crime Survey 2015

RFU Crime Map 2015

Reporting Suspicious Activity

  •  All communities are asked to remain vigilant and report suspicious behaviour to the police
  • Report individuals asking specific questions about, or taking pictures of, a facility or a farm’s processes
  • Report any attempts to purchase fertilisers, diesel, herbicides or pesticides by those not authorised or suspicious individuals
  • Take the registration number of any suspicious vehicles

Police Connect

To keep up-to-date with all the latest information about crime and policing issues in your area of Suffolk, sign up to the Free messaging service, Police Connect. To speak to someone at Suffolk Police, call the 101 non emergency telephone number.

However in an emergency always call 999 

Tractor/Equipment Security

Tractor equipmentAll property, including tractors/JCBs etc, should be uniquely marked, photographed and recorded somewhere safe. Details should include serial, chassis and model numbers.

Suffolk Police have a wide range of useful rural crime information, with topics range from equipment security to hare coursing, available on their website.

Shutting the Gate on Rural Crime Image
You can download the Suffolk Police Rural Crime Booklet which contains lots of useful information on Police rural crime initiatives. Suffolk Police also has a rural crime section and you can follow them on Twitter @RuralCrimeSfk

Fertiliser/Fuel Storage

Where possible store all fertiliser inside a dedicated locked building or compound.

Chemical Storage Bags

  • Do not leave fertiliser where it is visible to the public
  • Do not sell fertiliser unless the purchaser is known by you to be a bona-fide farmer or user
  • Record fertiliser deliveries and usage and carryout regular stock takes and Report immediately any stock discrepancy or loss to the police
  • Record any manufacturer code numbers from the bags and detonation resistance test certificates as you may be required to present them

Thefts from oil and diesel tanks are also on the increase. Here is some previously published information which suggests some simple steps to take to protect your storage tanks.

Watch Schemes

HorsewatchIn Suffolk there are a number of  ‘Watch’ schemes including: Farm Watch, Horse Watch, Allotment Watch, as well as the widely known Neighbourhood Watch. To read more about all about the different watch schemes and about how to join one, go to the Suffolk Police website.

The Charity Crimestoppers also launched the largest social media campaign in its 26 year history, specifically aimed at rural crime. Rural crime represents a major challenge to our society and it costs the United Kingdom in the region of £42,000,000 a year and this makes it a very lucrative source of income for the criminals.

The Health and Safety Executive has more information on farm safety and on the storage and transportation of fertilisers, particularly ammonium nitrate. They also have a multi-agency Leaflet about fertiliser storage.

Other useful sources of information about tackling Rural Crime include:

NFU Mutual
Farmers Guardian
Farmers Weekly
Crimestoppers
Suffolk Police and Crime Commissioner

Stay Safe This Christmas

Stay Safe

As in previous years, Suffolk County Council and Suffolk Police Community Safety Teams, together with many Partners, have put together this year’s Christmas Advent Calendar Campaign.  The aim of the campaign is to communicate, inform and generate more awareness about Social Responsibility and Staying Safe.

Staying Safe this Christmas campaign messages are about personal safety, property and home security, alcohol misuse, vulnerable people, and much much more.  Individual messages will published in a traditional Advent Calendar style on Social Media via Safer Suffolk Communities Facebook page and on Twitter via @SaferSuffolk using the hashtag #StaySafeThisChristmas.

We cannot hope to deliver all we would wish to achieve without the support of all of our Partners, so we would like to say a big Thank You to everyone for their input.   I would also like to encourage everyone reading this Blog to circulate it and Re-Tweet and Share the daily Advent Calendar messages to your colleagues, networks, family and friends.

The first Stay Safe This Christmas tip is from Suffolk Trading Standards.

When purchasing Christmas presents there is a website you can use to search for genuine products from brand owner approved shops. 

So as it’s 1 December, go ahead and click on the Advent Calendar window below to open the Christmas Staying Safe link for today.  Keep following us Twitter and Facebook for each new #StaySafeThisChristmas message.

1 Dec

Be careful when purchasing gifts on-line

Rural Crime – Tackling so called ‘Legal Highs’ and Illegal Drugs

Legal High rural imageA recent Telegraph article reported that Rural areas and small towns are facing an epidemic of so-called “legal high” drugs which police are struggling to tackle.  An all-party Home Affairs Select Committee said new synthetic drugs are appearing on the market at the rate of more than one a week, making it impossible for current drug laws to keep pace.

Deaths involving legal highs have increased from 29 in 2011 to 52 last year, a rise of 79 per cent.

What is a ‘Legal High’? The correct description is New Psychoactive Substances (NPS). We have put together an explanation of what legal highs contain, what the packaging looks like and the risks of taking them.

Suffolk Trading Standards are also asking for your help to get these products off the shelves by reporting anywhere you see these are being offered for sale.  Please report these to the Trading Standards Helpline on 08454 040506.  If you have any other issues or concerns you can report these by email to Suffolk Police at KeepingUsInformed@suffolk.pnn.police.uk

MPs have also warned that cannabis farms continue to blight rural villages. Recent reports of finds in Suffolk include a cannabis factory found in a bunker at Rendlesham. Possible signs of a cannabis factory could be:

  • Lighting and ventilation equipment.
  • Covered up or blocked up windows.
  • Comings and goings to a property at all hours.
  • Strong lighting day and night.
  • High levels of heat and condensation i.e windows constantly misted up.
  • The constant buzz of ventilation.
  • The strong sickly smell given off by cannabis plant.
  • Lots of power cables that could possibly link up to lamp posts so that they don’t have to pay for the large amounts of electricity they use.

If you suspect there is one near you please phone us on 101 or alternatively call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555111.

Rural Crime – Secure your Property


Tractor equipment
All property, including tractors/JCBs etc, should be uniquely marked, photographed and recorded somewhere safe. Details should include serial, chassis and model numbers. Suffolk Police have a wide range of useful rural crime information, with topics range from equipment security to hare coursing, available on their website.

Also available to download from the Police website is the ‘Shutting the gate on Rural Crime’ leaflet.  This leaflet contains details of all the Police rural crime initiatives. The information was supplied by local police forces and organisations and companies involved in helping to reduce rural crime.

 

Rural Crime

The Charity Crimestoppers has launched the largest social media campaign in its 26 year history, specifically aimed at rural crime. Rural crime represents a major challenge to our society and it costs the United Kingdom in the region of £42,000,000 a year and this makes it a very lucrative source of income for the criminals.

Crimestoppers are working extensively in partnership with a number of organisations including Suffolk Police, Neighbourhood Watch and rural and corporate partners, to form a strong campaigning platform to impact upon the damage of rural criminality and to identify the perpetrators responsible.  Find out lots more about the different elements of this rural crime campaign from Crimestoppers and their partners on their Blog.

Farm Crime SurveyHere is a survey which aims to establish how farms in England and Wales are affected by crime, and how farmers are protecting their property. Please help the collection of this information by completing the farm crime survey.

Reporting Suspicious Activity

  • All communities should remain vigilant and report suspicious behaviour to the police
  • Report individuals asking specific questions about, or taking pictures of, a facility or a farm’s processes
  • Report any attempts to purchase fertilisers, diesel, herbicides or pesticides by those not authorised or suspicious individuals
  • Take the registration number of any suspicious vehicles

PoliceDirect Logo

To keep up-to-date with all the latest information about crime and policing issues in your area of Suffolk, sign up to the Free messaging service, Police Direct. If you wish to speak to someone at Suffolk Police, then use the 101 non emergency telephone number.  However in an emergency always call 999 


Tractor/Equipment Security

Tractor equipmentAll property, including tractors/JCBs etc should be uniquely marked, photographed and recorded somewhere safe.  Details should include serial, chassis and model numbers. Suffolk Police have a wide range of useful rural crime information, with topics range from equipment security to hare coursing, available on their website.

Also on the website you can download ‘Shutting the gate on Rural Crime’, a useful leaflet containing all the Police rural crime initiatives.

Watch Schemes

In Suffolk there are a number of  ‘Watch’ schemes including: Horse Watch, Allotment Watch, Marine Watch, as well as the widely known Neighbourhood Watch. Read all about the different watch schemes and about how to join one, on the Suffolk Police website.

So called ‘Legal Highs’ and Illegal Drugs

Legal High rural imageA recent Telegraph article reported that Rural areas and small towns are facing an epidemic of so-called “legal high” drugs which police are struggling to tackle.  An all-party Home Affairs Select Committee said new synthetic drugs are appearing on the market at the rate of more than one a week, making it impossible for current drug laws to keep pace.

What is a ‘Legal High’? The correct description is New Psychoactive Substances (NPS). We have put together an explanation of what legal highs contain, what the packaging looks like, the risks of taking them and a request from Suffolk Trading Standards to help get them off the shelves by reporting where these are being sold to their Helpline on 08454 040506.  If you have any other issues or concerns you can report these by email to Suffolk Police at KeepingUsInformed@suffolk.pnn.police.uk

MPs have also warned that cannabis farms continue to blight rural villages. Recent reports of finds in Suffolk include a cannabis factory found in a bunker at RendleshamPossible signs of a cannabis factory could be:

  • Lighting and ventilation equipment.
  • Covered up or blocked up windows.
  • Comings and goings to a property at all hours.
  • Strong lighting day and night.
  • High levels of heat and condensation i.e windows constantly misted up.
  • The constant buzz of ventilation.
  • The strong sickly smell given off by cannabis plant.
  • Lots of power cables that could possibly link up to lamp posts so that they don’t have to pay for the large amounts of electricity they use.

If you suspect there is one near you please phone us on 101 or alternatively call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555111.

Fertiliser Storage

Where possible store all fertiliser inside a dedicated locked building or compound.

Chemical Storage Bags

  • Do not leave fertiliser where it is visible to the public
  • Do not sell fertiliser unless the purchaser is known by you to be a bona-fide farmer or user
  • Record fertiliser deliveries and usage and carryout regular stock takes and Report immediately any stock discrepancy or loss to the police
  • Record any manufacturer code numbers from the bags and detonation resistance test certificates as you may be required to present them

The Health and Safety Executive can provide further advice on the storage and transportation of fertilisers, particularly ammonium nitrate. You can also download a multi-agency Leaflet about fertiliser storage.

‘CESAR’ the DAY – CANCELLED

Agricultural Vehicle Marking

Norfolk and Suffolk Police, together with the NFU, were holding Agricultural Machinery Marking Sessions on 7 and 8 November.   Unfortunately this has been cancelled due to lack of bookings.

The Construction & Agricultural Equipment Security and Registration Scheme (CESAR) is promoted by the Construction Equipment Association (CEA) and supported by the Agricultural Engineers Association.  Their website contains comprehensive information on how the Scheme works.

Security and Safety Advice for the storing of Fertiliser

This information is circulated on the advice of Suffolk Police, however the advice given has been developed by the Agricultural Industries Confederation (AIC), National Farmers’ Unions and the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO).

There have been reports of thefts in the country.  Please report any suspicious activity/ thefts immediately.

Suspicious Activity

  • All communities should remain vigilant and report suspicious behaviour to the police
  • Report individuals asking specific questions about, or taking pictures of, a facility or a farm’s processes
  • Report any attempts to purchase fertilisers, diesel, herbicides or pesticides by those not authorised or suspicious individuals

101 is now the number to call your local police
In an emergency always call 999

Chemical Storage

Chemical Storage Bags

  • Where possible store all fertiliser inside a dedicated locked building or compound
  • Do not leave fertiliser where it is visible to the public
  • Do not sell fertiliser unless the purchaser is known by you to be a bona-fide farmer or user
  • Record fertiliser deliveries and usage and carryout regular stock takes and Report immediately any stock discrepancy or loss to the police
  • Record any manufacturer code numbers from the bags and detonation resistance test certificates as you may be required to present them
  • The Health and Safety Executive can provide further advice on the storage and transportation of fertilisers, particularly ammonium nitrate

From here you can download an Alert Leaflet containing all the relevant details.