Staying Safe at Outside Events – July 2015

Watching your favourite singer or band from the comfort of your armchair is great, but there’s nothing like being there live on the day. Tickets to big entertainment and sporting events sell out very quickly, which is very disappointing when you’ve really been looking forward to the big day.

This can make it very tempting to buy them from sources other than official websites. If your ticket is found not to be genuine you will be refused entry.  Here is some advice from Get Safe Online.

There are a number of great music events and festivals taking place in and around Suffolk in 2015. Some of the events in July include:

Audience Shot

In partnership with Suffolk Police we have produced the ‘staying safe’ messages below. The issues raised are relevant for all outside events. Suffolk Local Safeguarding Children Board, Safe and Sound Welfare and Ormiston have published Guidance for the Latitude Festival for the protection of children and vulnerable adults attending.  Latitude takes place every July.

Consider your own personal safety

Arrange a meeting point and agree a time in case you get separated from your friends. Drink too much and you’re likely to feel disorientated.  You can’t always rely on mobile phones, so it’s a good idea to make sure you don’t run your battery down completely. Some larger festivals may have recharging points.

  • Stick with friends and if you are camping, don’t go back to your tent alone
  • Enjoy the Festival/Event, but look after yourself and your friends
  • Keep hydrated and wear suitable clothing, taking into consideration the weather forecast.

Moderate your alcohol consumption

The best way to avoid problems from alcohol is to stay within the recommended limits. So keep a count of what you are drinking. Recognise when you’re drinking too quickly. Sometimes you might just be thirsty rather than really wanting an alcoholic drink. Don’t ruin your enjoyment of the festival by overdoing it and if the festival goes on for more than one day, give your body a break from the booze on at least one of the days and avoid morning drinking altogether.

  • Think When You Drink: alcohol affects everyone in very different ways.
    “Think Again before you drink another drop”
  • Think Fights: alcohol can make people more aggressive
  • Know Your Alcohol Limit: and stick to it. Importantly, don’t drink and drive, even the morning after as you may still be over the limit.
  • Spiking:  never leave your drinks unattended, even soft drinks get spiked
  • Time to Stop: If you have sex without the other person’s consent you could end up going to prison for rape. Just like with alcohol, you need to know when to stop! Saying no means the same in every language

Under the influence of alcohol you are more likely to find yourself in a vulnerable situation

Look After Your Valuables

Concerts and Festivals are not hotbeds of crime, but thefts do happen. They are more likely to occur if you have had lots of alcohol and you may not be aware of what’s going on around you.

Camping 1

 

If you are planning on camping at any of these or future events, check out ROSPA’s safety advice.

 

Try not to bring valuables like mp3 players or jewellery with you.

  • Don’t carry your wallet or phone in your back pocket
  • Do not leave valuables in your tent
  • If you do leave things of value in your car put them out of sight in the boot and make sure you lock your vehicle

Please take some time to consider your personal safety and remain vigilant so you don’t become a victim of theft or any other crime. Report any suspicious persons to a member of security at the event or to the Camp site Assistance Team. There are usually a number of Festival and Town Pastors also in attendance at many of the larger events.  These are people who will help anyone who needs assistance.

Staying Safe at Outside Events – June 2015

Watching your favourite singer or band from the comfort of your armchair is great, but there’s nothing like being there live on the day. Tickets to big entertainment and sporting events sell out very quickly, which is very disappointing when you’ve really been looking forward to the big day.

This can make it very tempting to buy them from sources other than official websites. If your ticket is found not to be genuine you will be refused entry.  Here is some advice from Get Safe Online.

There are a number of great music events and festivals taking place in and around Suffolk in 2015. Some of the events in June include:

Audience Shot

In partnership with Suffolk Police we have produced the ‘staying safe’ messages below. The issues raised are relevant for all outside events.  Suffolk Local Safeguarding Children Board, Safe and Sound Welfare and Ormiston have published Guidance for the Latitude Festival for the protection of children and vulnerable adults attending.  Latitude takes place every July.

Consider your own personal safety

Arrange a meeting point and agree a time in case you get separated from your friends. Drink too much and you’re likely to feel disorientated.  You can’t always rely on mobile phones, so it’s a good idea to make sure you don’t run your battery down completely. Some larger festivals may have recharging points.

  • Stick with friends and if you are camping, don’t go back to your tent alone
  • Enjoy the Festival/Event, but look after yourself and your friends
  • Keep hydrated and wear suitable clothing, taking into consideration the weather forecast.

Moderate your alcohol consumption

The best way to avoid problems from alcohol is to stay within the recommended limits. So keep a count of what you are drinking. Recognise when you’re drinking too quickly. Sometimes you might just be thirsty rather than really wanting an alcoholic drink. Don’t ruin your enjoyment of the festival by overdoing it and if the festival goes on for more than one day, give your body a break from the booze on at least one of the days and avoid morning drinking altogether.

  • Think When You Drink: alcohol affects everyone in very different ways.
    “Think Again before you drink another drop”
  • Think Fights: alcohol can make people more aggressive
  • Know Your Alcohol Limit: and stick to it. Importantly, don’t drink and drive, even the morning after as you may still be over the limit.
  • Spiking:  never leave your drinks unattended, even soft drinks get spiked
  • Time to Stop: If you have sex without the other person’s consent you could end up going to prison for rape. Just like with alcohol, you need to know when to stop! Saying no means the same in every language

Under the influence of alcohol you are more likely to find yourself in a vulnerable situation

Look After Your Valuables

Concerts and Festivals are not hotbeds of crime, but thefts do happen. They are more likely to occur if you have had lots of alcohol and you may not be aware of what’s going on around you.

Camping 1

 

If you are planning on camping at any of these or future events, check out ROSPA’s safety advice.

 

Try not to bring valuables like mp3 players or jewellery with you.

  • Don’t carry your wallet or phone in your back pocket
  • Do not leave valuables in your tent
  • If you do leave things of value in your car put them out of sight in the boot and make sure you lock your vehicle

Please take some time to consider your personal safety and remain vigilant so you don’t become a victim of theft or any other crime. Report any suspicious persons to a member of security at the event or to the Camp site Assistance Team. There are usually a number of Festival and Town Pastors also in attendance at many of the larger events.  These are people who will help anyone who needs assistance.

Staying Safe at Outside Events – May 2015

There are a number of great music events and festivals taking place in and around Suffolk in 2015. Some of the events in May include:

Audience Shot

In partnership with Suffolk Police we have produced the ‘staying safe’ messages below. The issues raised are relevant for all outside events:

Consider your own personal safety

Arrange a meeting point and agree a time in case you get separated from your friends. Drink too much and you’re likely to feel disorientated.  You can’t always rely on mobile phones, so it’s a good idea to make sure you don’t run your battery down completely. Some larger festivals may have recharging points.

  • Stick with friends and if you are camping, don’t go back to your tent alone
  • Enjoy the Festival/Event, but look after yourself and your friends
  • Keep hydrated and wear suitable clothing, taking into consideration the weather forecast.

Moderate your alcohol consumption

The best way to avoid problems from alcohol is to stay within the recommended limits. So keep a count of what you are drinking. Recognise when you’re drinking too quickly. Sometimes you might just be thirsty rather than really wanting an alcoholic drink. Don’t ruin your enjoyment of the festival by overdoing it and if the festival goes on for more than one day, give your body a break from the booze on at least one of the days and avoid morning drinking altogether.

  • Think When You Drink: alcohol affects everyone in very different ways.
    “Think Again before you drink another drop”
  • Think Fights: alcohol can make people more aggressive
  • Know Your Alcohol Limit: and stick to it. Importantly, don’t drink and drive, even the morning after as you may still be over the limit.
  • Spiking:  never leave your drinks unattended, even soft drinks get spiked
  • Time to Stop: If you have sex without the other person’s consent you could end up going to prison for rape. Just like with alcohol, you need to know when to stop! Saying no means the same in every language

Under the influence of alcohol you are more likely to find yourself in a vulnerable situation

Look After Your Valuables

Concerts and Festivals are not hotbeds of crime, but thefts do happen. They are more likely to occur if you have had lots of alcohol and you may not be aware of what’s going on around you.

Camping 1

 

If you are planning on camping at any of these or future events, check out ROSPA’s safety advice.

 

Try not to bring valuables like mp3 players or jewellery with you.

  • Don’t carry your wallet or phone in your back pocket
  • Do not leave valuables in your tent
  • If you do leave things of value in your car put them out of sight in the boot and make sure you lock your vehicle

Please take some time to consider your personal safety and remain vigilant so you don’t become a victim of theft or any other crime. Report any suspicious persons to a member of security at the event or to the Camp site Assistance Team. There are usually a number of Festival and Town Pastors also in attendance at many of the larger events.  These are people who will help anyone who needs assistance.

Drug dealers don’t care – do you?

Crimestoppers Logo

 

 

 

The independent crime-fighting charity Crimestoppers has recently launched a campaign to encourage Ipswich residents to speak up about drug dealing gangs.

The campaign was kick started by a series of advertising on billboards, bus shelters and VIPA Imagephone boxes across Ipswich town centre and was followed by a series of advertising banners on the platforms at Ipswich train station. It continues for the next few months with postcards being put through the letterboxes of Ipswich homes, corex boards and posters being displayed in community areas, Facebook adverts and radio adverts on Town 102.

Campaign Example: Is there a VIPA‘s nest in your community?

 

The Charity will also be going into local schools and youth clubs this week to tell those aged between 11- 17 about the Crimestoppers youth brand Fearless (www.fearless.org). They will be joining forces with the St Giles Trust who will be sending some ex-gang members to recount their experiences and highlight the choices open to them, including giving information anonymously to Fearless.

Ann Scott, Eastern Regional Manager for Crimestoppers, said: “People often ask me why someone would not contact the police if they knew about drug dealing in their community or about someone who carried a knife, or someone who was being sexually exploited by a gang. The fear of a criminal finding out that you have gone to the police about them can paralyse a community. Crimestoppers removes that concern and gives people peace of mind”.

She added: “People should feel safe and secure in their own community. No one has anything to fear by contacting Crimestoppers, as you will remain anonymous. We never ask for your name and no personal details are taken; calls are not recorded, calls/online forms cannot be traced and you will not have to go to court or give a statement to the police. In the 26 years that Crimestoppers has been running we have never broken our promise of anonymity”.

Ipswich Policing Commander Superintendent Louisa Pepper commented: “Although we do not have a significant drug problem in Ipswich, we want to show those who are involved in this activity that it will not be tolerated in Suffolk.  We regularly act on intelligence provided by the local community and are present on the streets to catch offenders red-handed with drugs in their possession.  We recognise the effect this issue can have on a community and the associated crime it can bring along with it. I encourage you to not suffer in silence and give us the vital information to hold drug dealers accountable for their actions.”

The campaign has been funded by the Eastern Region Special Operations Unit, which has dedicated resources to combat gang activity. Detective Inspector Graham Smith from ERSOU said: “The message we want to get across is to urge members of the community to speak out about gang crime. Gangs cause misery to communities and often those involved, who can end up with criminal records and reduced prospects in life. We want people to be aware of the dangers and help prevent their loved ones being drawn into gang crime.”

Crimestoppers plays a significant part in the fight against crime. 1,000 people contact the charity every day to give information about crime, which leads to an average of 17 arrests every day.

Members of the public are eligible to claim a reward of up to £1,000 if their information given to Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 leads to a successful arrest and charge. They can also complete a ‘giving information’ form on the Crimestoppers website www.crimestoppers-uk.org

 

Working with Partners to Keep Suffolk Safe

Plan and Stay Safe

Suffolk is one of the safest places to live and work and the chances that you, your friends, family or your neighbours will become a victim of crime, are low. However, if you are planning a day out, going on holiday or just going out for the evening; take some time to think about your personal safety and the security of your home, your possessions and any vehicles.

Personal Safety: 

  • Arrange a meeting point and rendezvous time in case you get separated from friends.
  • You can’t always rely on mobile phones, although it’s a good idea to make sure you don’t run your battery down completely, and
  • Keep your mobile safe and don’t carry your wallet or mobile phone in your back pocket or leave it on a table.  Register your mobile at www.immobilise.com and increase your chances of getting it back if it’s lost or stolen.
  • Always pre-book your taxi and make sure you get the right one!
  • Do not accept lifts from strangers or go home with someone you have just met.
  • Have fun, but look after yourself and your friends and ensure that everyone gets home safely.

Before you you leave home:

Also you could check out these ‘YouTube’ clips about how to secure your house, deter potential burglars and other security measures:

YouTube Logo

Top ten tips to keep your house secure and deter potential burglars
Further Home security tips
Don’t leave valuables in an unlocked shed, nor ladders or tools that could help a burglar
Lock windows and doors

 

 Working to keep the people of Suffolk safe

Staying Safe at Outside Events – April 2015

There are a number of great music events and festivals taking place in Suffolk in 2015.
For April this includes:

Audience Shot

In partnership with Suffolk Police we have produced the ‘staying safe’ messages below. The issues raised are relevant for all outside events:

Consider your own personal safety

Arrange a meeting point and agree a time in case you get separated from your friends. Drink too much and you’re likely to feel disorientated.  You can’t always rely on mobile phones, so it’s a good idea to make sure you don’t run your battery down completely. Some larger festivals may have recharging points.

  • Stick with friends and if you are camping, don’t go back to your tent alone
  • Enjoy the Festival/Event, but look after yourself and your friends
  • Keep hydrated and wear suitable clothing, taking into consideration the weather forecast.

Moderate your alcohol consumption

The best way to avoid problems from alcohol is to stay within the recommended limits. So keep a count of what you are drinking. Recognise when you’re drinking too quickly. Sometimes you might just be thirsty rather than really wanting an alcoholic drink. Don’t ruin your enjoyment of the festival by overdoing it and if the festival goes on for more than one day, give your body a break from the booze on at least one of the days and avoid morning drinking altogether.

  • Think When You Drink: alcohol affects everyone in very different ways.
    “Think Again before you drink another drop”
  • Think Fights: alcohol can make people more aggressive
  • Know Your Alcohol Limit: and stick to it. Importantly, don’t drink and drive, even the morning after as you may still be over the limit.
  • Spiking:  never leave your drinks unattended, even soft drinks get spiked
  • Time to Stop: If you have sex without the other person’s consent you could end up going to prison for rape. Just like with alcohol, you need to know when to stop! Saying no means the same in every language

Under the influence of alcohol you are more likely to find yourself in a vulnerable situation

Look After Your Valuables

Concerts and Festivals are not hotbeds of crime, but thefts do happen. They are more likely to occur if you have had lots of alcohol and you may not be aware of what’s going on around you.

Camping 1

 

If you are planning on camping at any of these or future events, check out ROSPA’s safety advice.

 

Try not to bring valuables like mp3 players or jewellery with you.

  • Don’t carry your wallet or phone in your back pocket
  • Do not leave valuables in your tent
  • If you do leave things of value in your car put them out of sight in the boot and make sure you lock your vehicle

Please take some time to consider your personal safety and remain vigilant so you don’t become a victim of theft or any other crime. Report any suspicious persons to a member of security at the event or to the Camp site Assistance Team. There are usually a number of Festival and Town Pastors also in attendance at many of the larger events.  These are people who will help anyone who needs assistance.

Have a great time and stay safe

Crimestoppers – Fearless Training

Fearless logo

Crimestoppers is offering FREE training on its youth brand, Fearless.org. The service allows young people aged 11–17 to give information about crime 100% anonymously if they feel unable to tell police, parents of teachers.

Here is Fearless Training leaflet which contains more information.

Each session covers:

  1. Crimestoppers and our unique selling points
  2. Fearless and its key messages
  3. Free resources available to you and how you can use Fearless to your benefit
  4. Working with young people and talking about crime
  5. The concept of snitching
  6. Practical examples of how others have made Fearless sustainable

It is particularly useful for PCSOs, PCs who work in schools, youth workers, youth offending officers and teachers. All attendees get to take away with them Fearless materials, including curriculum based teaching resources subject to availability. This training is part of a wider campaign to tackle gang related violence in Ipswich.

The session is to take place on Thursday 12th March from 1pm – 4pm in the Ipswich area, (venue yet to be confirmed).

If you wish to attend please respond to Ann Scott at ann.scott@crimestoppers-uk.org or 01255 475954. First come first served as limited spaces.

Crimestoppers Logo