Staying Safe at Outside Events – May/June 2016

Watching your favourite singer or band from the comfort of your armchair is great, but there’s nothing like being there live on the day. Tickets to big entertainment and sporting events sell out very quickly, which is very disappointing when you’ve really been looking forward to the big day.

This can make it very tempting to buy them from sources other than official websites. If your ticket is found not to be genuine you will be refused entry.  Here is some advice about purchasing tickets from Get Safe Online.

There are a number of great music events and festivals taking place in and around Suffolk in 2016, you may also be travelling out of County to events too.  We would like to encourage you to take a few minutes to think about your personal and property safety at these events, so in partnership with Suffolk Police, we have produced the ‘staying safe’ messages below. This information is also relevant for any/all large events.

Some of events you may be planning on attending during May/June might include:

Audience Shot

Consider your own personal safety

Arrange a meeting point and agree a time in case you get separated from your friends. Drink too much and you’re likely to feel disorientated.  You can’t always rely on mobile phones, so it’s a good idea to make sure you don’t run your battery down completely. Some larger festivals may have recharging points.

  • Stick with friends and if you are camping, don’t go back to your tent alone
  • Enjoy the Festival/Event, but look after yourself and your friends
  • Keep hydrated and wear suitable clothing, taking into consideration the weather forecast.

Moderate your alcohol consumption

The best way to avoid problems from alcohol is to stay within the recommended limits. So keep a count of what you are drinking. Recognise when you’re drinking too quickly. Sometimes you might just be thirsty rather than really wanting an alcoholic drink. Don’t ruin your enjoyment of the festival by overdoing it and if the festival goes on for more than one day, give your body a break from the booze on at least one of the days and avoid morning drinking altogether.

Under the influence of alcohol you are more likely to find yourself in a vulnerable situation

Look After Your Valuables

Concerts and Festivals are not hotbeds of crime, but thefts do happen. They are more likely to occur if you have had lots of alcohol and you may not be aware of what’s going on around you.

Camping 1

If you are planning on camping at any of these or future events, check out ROSPA’s safety advice.

Try not to bring valuables like mp3 players or jewellery with you.

  • Don’t carry your wallet or phone in your back pocket
  • Do not leave valuables in your tent
  • If you do leave things of value in your car put them out of sight in the boot and make sure you lock your vehicle

Report any suspicious persons to a member of security at the event or to the Camp site Assistance Team. There are usually a number of Festival and Town Pastors also in attendance at many of the larger events.  These are people who will help anyone who needs assistance.

Please take some time to consider your personal safety and remain vigilant so you don’t become a victim of theft or any other crime.

Most Importantly
Have a wonderful time and Stay Safe

Staying Safe by Open Water

Colleagues in Suffolk Fire and Rescue have teamed up with Anglian Water to reinforce messages about staying safe around water this Water Safety Week. You can follow Suffolk Fire and Rescue on Twitter and Facebook for all their latest messages.

Be Water Aware

Cooling off in rivers, canals, ponds, quarries and lakes looks fun, but it can have deadly consequences. Every year emergency services are called to incidents where residents (particularly children and young people) get into difficulty when swimming in open water.

We would encourage everyone to share information about the dangers of cooling off in open water and to take heed of all water safety notices which warn of the dangers.

 

 

Swimming in reservoirs is dangerous. Swimming in Open Water

Anglian Water has lots more advice about staying safe when visiting their water parks. These are operational sites and even the strongest swimmers can get into serious difficulties.

Dangers of cooling off in open water

The water may look calm on the surface, but there may still be strong undercurrents that could pull even a strong swimmer under. The water may also feel relatively warm on the surface, but just a few feet below can be icy cold even in the hot weather and can very quickly cause severe cramp and hypothermia.

Young people often misjudge their swimming ability – they may view a river or lake as a tempting means of cooling off during a hot spell of weather, but fail to appreciate the harmful effects that the cold water can have on their stamina and strength.

Due to these dangers, we are urging people, particularly children and teenagers, not to swim anywhere other than in purpose-built and supervised swimming pools.

What to do if you see someone in difficulties

Around water - How to help

  • Get help: ring 999 or get someone else to do it. Alternatively if you are on your own without a mobile phone, call for help if you can see people nearby, or go and get help.
  • Think: of your own safety first. Don’t put yourself in danger by going into the water to rescue someone – you may get in difficulties in the water too.
  • Look: for any safety equipment close at hand such as lifebuoys or throwing lines.
  • Reach: a stick, scarf or clothes tied together can help you reach the person. Crouch or lie down to avoid being pulled into the water yourself.
  • Throw: a rope is best because you can then pull the person in. If you don’t have any rope, throwing something in that will float such as a football or even an empty plastic bottle will help in keeping the person afloat until help arrives.
  • Keep warm: once rescued, keep the casualty warm and ensure they get medical help as soon as possible.

Tombstoning – Why is it dangerous?

Tombstoning offers a high-risk, high-impact experience but it can have severe and life-threatening consequences. This is because:

  • Water depths alter with the tide – the water may be shallower than it seems
  • Submerged objects like rocks may not be visible – these can cause serious impact injuries
  • The shock of cold water can make it difficult to swim
  • Getting out of the water is often more difficult than people realise
  • Strong currents can rapidly sweep people away

Tombstoning Check out ROSPA’s advice.

Key safety tips for staying safe near water

  • Alcohol and swimming do not mix – stay out of the water if you have been drinking.
  • Always watch your child while at the beach, lake or other natural bodies of water.
  • Never let older children swim in unsupervised areas like quarries, canals or ponds.
  • Do not swim near motor boats, jet skis or other power vehicles.
  • Never interfere with lifesaving equipment – you might need it yourself.
  • Learn to spot and keep away from dangerous water.
  • Take safety advice – heed notices which warn you of the danger.
  • Children should always visit open water sites with a grown-up.
  • Swimming anywhere other than at purpose built and supervised swimming pools is highly dangerous and is not recommended.

ROSPA Logo

More advice and information about water safety including garden ponds, ice safety, bath seats and child drowning can be found on the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (ROSPA) website.

Royal Lifesaving Society logo

Further advice is also available from the Royal Lifesaving Society

Staying Safe at Outside Events – March/April 2016

Watching your favourite singer or band from the comfort of your armchair is great, but there’s nothing like being there live on the day. Tickets to big entertainment and sporting events sell out very quickly, which is very disappointing when you’ve really been looking forward to the big day.

This can make it very tempting to buy them from sources other than official websites. If your ticket is found not to be genuine you will be refused entry.  Here is some advice from Get Safe Online.

There are a number of great music events and festivals taking place in and around Suffolk in 2016. Some of the events in March/April include:

Audience Shot

In partnership with Suffolk Police we have produced the ‘staying safe’ messages below. The issues raised are relevant for all outside events.

Consider your own personal safety

Arrange a meeting point and agree a time in case you get separated from your friends. Drink too much and you’re likely to feel disorientated.  You can’t always rely on mobile phones, so it’s a good idea to make sure you don’t run your battery down completely. Some larger festivals may have recharging points.

  • Stick with friends and if you are camping, don’t go back to your tent alone
  • Enjoy the Festival/Event, but look after yourself and your friends
  • Keep hydrated and wear suitable clothing, taking into consideration the weather forecast.

Moderate your alcohol consumption

The best way to avoid problems from alcohol is to stay within the recommended limits. So keep a count of what you are drinking. Recognise when you’re drinking too quickly. Sometimes you might just be thirsty rather than really wanting an alcoholic drink. Don’t ruin your enjoyment of the festival by overdoing it and if the festival goes on for more than one day, give your body a break from the booze on at least one of the days and avoid morning drinking altogether.

  • Think When You Drink: alcohol affects everyone in very different ways.
    “Think Again before you drink another drop”
  • Think Fights: alcohol can make people more aggressive
  • Know Your Alcohol Limit: and stick to it. Importantly, don’t drink and drive, even the morning after as you may still be over the limit.
  • Spiking:  never leave your drinks unattended, even soft drinks get spiked
  • Time to Stop: If you have sex without the other person’s consent you could end up going to prison for rape. Just like with alcohol, you need to know when to stop! Saying no means the same in every language

Under the influence of alcohol you are more likely to find yourself in a vulnerable situation

Look After Your Valuables

Concerts and Festivals are not hotbeds of crime, but thefts do happen. They are more likely to occur if you have had lots of alcohol and you may not be aware of what’s going on around you.

Camping 1

If you are planning on camping at any of these or future events, check out ROSPA’s safety advice.

Try not to bring valuables like mp3 players or jewellery with you.

  • Don’t carry your wallet or phone in your back pocket
  • Do not leave valuables in your tent
  • If you do leave things of value in your car put them out of sight in the boot and make sure you lock your vehicle

Report any suspicious persons to a member of security at the event or to the Camp site Assistance Team. There are usually a number of Festival and Town Pastors also in attendance at many of the larger events.  These are people who will help anyone who needs assistance.

Please take some time to consider your personal safety and remain vigilant so you don’t become a victim of theft or any other crime.

Most Importantly
Have a wonderful time and Stay Safe

Staying Safe on a night out

We want people to enjoy themselves on a night out or at a party with their friends. However in partnership with Suffolk Police we have produced a number of ‘Staying Safe’ messages. A summary of the main points are below.

Consider your own personal safety

Arrange a meeting point and agree a time in case you get separated from your friends. Drink too much and you are likely to feel disorientated and you cannot always rely on mobile phones, so it’s a good idea to make sure your battery is fully charged before going out.

Look After Your Valuables

Unfortunately thefts do happen so:

  • Don’t leave things of value visible inside in your car, put them out of sight in the boot
  • Make sure you lock your vehicle
  • Don’t leave handbags/shopping bags unattended
  • Don’t carry your wallet or phone in your back pocket

Moderate your alcohol consumptionCheers

The best way to avoid problems from alcohol is to stay within the recommended limits. So be mindful of what and how much you are drinking. Don’t ruin your enjoyment by overdoing it.

This is not a crime Rape is

Under the influence of alcohol you are more likely to find yourself in a vulnerable situation. Plan your journey home.

Whos Taking You Home

Be Prepared, Take Care and Stay Safe this Christmas

Public Health and NHS

 

 

 

 

Suffolk Public Health and NHS tells us that last year winter was difficult for the health system across England, and Suffolk was no exception. For years health systems have seen increasing numbers of people who are living better for longer. This also means there are more people with several long term conditions.

There are a number of things you can do, or help someone you care for to do, to ensure that you don’t get caught out this winter:

  • Be prepared – stock up with cold remedies, pain killers, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen, stave off upset stomachs with anti-diarrhoea and rehydration mixtures, and keep plasters and bandages on hand for any cuts or scrapes.
  • Get a flu vaccination – it will keep you from having a long recovery from this nasty illness, so book an appointment to get one if you haven’t already. People aged 65 or over, or have a long-term health condition or are pregnant are entitled to a free jab.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly – for the time it takes you to sing happy birthday through twice, use hot water and soap to wash away all kinds of viruses from colds and diarrhoea to so much more.
  • Seek help from your pharmacist – they are qualified health professionals who can advise on everything from a cold to long-term conditions.  This is often the best and quickest way to get well. Your pharmacist will let you know if a GP appointment is required. Pharmacies are one of the most accessible sources of advice, with many open long hours incl. evenings and weekends. Some pharmacies are open on Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day.
  • Eat well and drink at least eight cups of fluids a day – it keeps your brain and body working well.
  •  Keep your home warm – By setting your heating to the right temperature (between 18° – 21°C or 64°- 70°F) you can keep you well, especially avoiding chest infections. If you have a disability, are over 65 or live with children aged under 5 ring this local rate number for free advice on heating your home. 03456 037 686
  •  Not feeling well – If you are unsure if you need urgent or emergency care, please call NHS 111 – trained professionals are on hand to guide you.
  •  Beat the winter blues – talk to someone. Talk about your anxieties with someone else, a friend, relative or a group such as the Samaritans. Talking about the things that are worrying you can make a big difference. It is easy to get help from the Suffolk Wellbeing Service too. This is a free NHS service, suitable for people aged 16 + living in Suffolk. You can phone them on 0300 123 1781 or refer yourself via their website.

Do you have any Elderly and Vulnerable Neighbours?

Are you able to spend a few minutes to ensure that: On their own

  • they are not alone all the time
  • their paths are clear of snow and ice
  • they have plenty of food in
  • they are warm enough
  • they have sufficient medication to get through the holiday period
  • if they can use the internet, that they know where to look for information and support

Further information and support over the Christmas and New Year Period

Visiting friends and family this Christmas, or just venturing out, keep up to date with the latest road, rail and weather news.

  •  Suffolk County Council has lots of information about how they plan to keep public highways safe and usable in winter. Their website also has links to information about travel and possible transport disruption and to the latest weather reports.

    Suffolk County Council has also published it’s opening times over this Christmas and New Year period for 2015/16; together with details of who to contact for social care emergencies in Suffolk.

  • There are likely to be disruptions to rail services with some cancellations of trains this Christmas and New Year.
  • Suffolk Police has advice and festive tips on home security, shopping and celebrating, to ensure you have a happy and  crime free Christmas.

Stay Safe

 

Festive Season Celebrations

Stay Safe

 

 

 

 

We want people to enjoy themselves this Festive Season, however in partnership with Suffolk Police and other Partners we have produced a number of ‘Staying Safe This Christmas‘ messages.  A summary of the main points are below.

Consider your own personal safety

Arrange a meeting point and agree a time in case you get separated from your friends. Drink too much and you are likely to feel disorientated and you cannot always rely on mobile phones, so it’s a good idea to make sure your battery is fully charged before going out.

Look After Your Valuables

Unfortunately thefts do happen and they are more likely to occur if you have had lots of alcohol and you may not be aware of what’s going on around you.

  • If you do leave things of value in your car put them out of sight in the boot and make sure you lock your vehicle
  • Don’t carry your wallet or phone in your back pocket

Moderate your alcohol consumption

The best way to avoid problems from alcohol is to stay within the recommended limits. So be mindful of what and how much you are drinking. Don’t ruin your enjoyment of the festive season by overdoing it.

Under the influence of alcohol you are more likely to find yourself in a vulnerable situation

Whos Taking You Home

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) What are the Signs?

NSPCC Every Childhood

Child Sexual Exploitation is defined by the NSPCC as a form of sexual abuse in which children are sexually exploited for money, power or status.  Warning signs for sexual exploitation can be hard to identify and can be easily be mistaken for ‘normal’ teenage behaviour.  However, the signs to look out for include:

  • Young people involved in abusive relationships, intimidated and fearful of certain people or situations
  • Young people hanging out with older people or anti-social groups or with other vulnerable peers, including others involved with CSE
  • Young people getting involved in gangs, gang fights and gang membership;
  • Having older boy or girlfriends
  • Having new things like clothes or mobile phones which they can’t or won’t explain
  • Having access to drugs or alcohol
  • Spending time at places of concern such as hotels or known brothels
  • Young people who don’t know where they are because they have been moved around the country
  • Young people that go missing from home, care or education

Smaller Third Party Logo
Crimestoppers
 is making a stance to demonstrate that child exploitation will not be tolerated. The independent charity is working to educate communities about the threat of CSE by highlighting the signs and explaining how the public can report if they think it’s happening to someone they know.Crimestoppers CSE Image

As Crimestoppers is an independent anonymous charity, they can provide a unique service by allowing those who are perhaps closer to the victims or offenders to report what they know, without any fear of being identified.

When you give information to Crimestoppers they will never asked you your name, no personal information is taken, calls are not recorded. They cannot trace your call or IP addresses of your computer or mobile device. You do not have to go to court or give a statement to the police. Crimestoppers are a safe alternative for those who do not wish to go to the Police. As such, they provide the police and other law enforcement with information which they might otherwise not have had access to.

The Crimestoppers Fearless brand also helps to engage young people through the use of the fearless.org website. Often young people don’t recognise the signs of being in a coercive relationship. The Fearless campaign aims to help young people to identify the signs of potential exploitation, and give them a means to report what is happening.

Suffolk Police are taking steps to raise awareness of CSE, and Crimestoppers can provide the strong call to action for those who are fearful of reporting it to the relevant authorities. In the case of young people, if they feel uncomfortable about discussing these issues with a teacher, parent or other adult, Fearless provides them with another option.

Crimestoppers is working with Suffolk Police to target parents, teachers, youth workers and young people themselves, to raise awareness across the Suffolk of the signs of CSE. It will raise public awareness and understanding of the signs to look out for. Leaflets and other marketing materials will be distributed across Suffolk to support this campaign.

Flyer ImageHere are some Crimestoppers CSE flyers which you can download to display and distribute.

If you are concerned that a young person may be subject to CSE, please contact the police on 101 (or 999 in an emergency) or call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.  The NSPCC also run a helpline on 0800 800 5000.

 

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